fotoz n wurdz

I'm Dannielle, this is my blog.
co-created Everyone is Gay
co-wrote This is a Book For Parents of Gay Kids
created Lesbians Who Look Like Justin Bieber
aaaand I like shoes.

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Every Lindsay Lohan Movie (2/19) Life Size (2000)

Why do I feel like I’m in a bad horror movie?

RMM: What are your dislikes, either musically, or in the music industry, or even in real life? 

LO: Oh boy. Dislikes. In typing out this answer, it kinda turned into an essay. Aren’t email interviews the best? Here we go.

As a woman making music and posting it on the internet, I’ve grown pretty weary of the different standards applied to men and women and the contrasting reactions to very similar products from both. The older I get, the less patience I have for it. I’ve put a lot of videos on YouTube over the years (which one could say is “asking for it”, but fuck that), and it’s unfortunately been pretty illuminating.

Sure, there are people who are trolling and say awful, sexist, sometimes violent things, which is inexcusable. Everyone knows this. What I’m more bothered by is the people who think they’re being complimentary, or at least neutral. It’s mostly comments about my appearance. When I’ve put so much work into this song and video, arranging and playing these parts, mixing and mastering this song, it blows my mind that anyone can think it’s appropriate or relevant to talk about my hair, or weigh in on which of my outfits was the cutest. Tell me the vocals were too loud. Tell me the bassline sucks. Tell me you loved/hated the song and you don’t know why. The visual element can matter, sure. Watching someone perform and be expressive can affect your reaction to the song. But my hair? I’m trying to communicate something, and it has nothing to do with hair. To tell me that you walked away from my video thinking about hair is to tell me that I’ve failed.

But how can I change this? As a musician who is trying to present music to the world, it begins to feel like a lose-lose. How do I make all of this stuff not matter? Is there a way to dress on camera in order to not have people comment on my clothes or my body? My guess is no, but if there were, should I have to conform to that in order for my work to be front and center? It’s hard to know if I’ve succeeded with a message when it’s inevitably weighed down (or raised up, or dragged a thousand miles east or west) by something else that I never wanted to communicate at all.

If a woman desexualizes herself entirely, then that becomes the focus. If a guy is playing music in a hoodie or his pajamas, he’s down-to-earth and it’s awesome (no really, it probably is), but for a woman to dress in unflattering or frumpy clothes is for her to somehow spit in the face of the universe and its gifts (e.g., gossip magazines shaming Ellen Page for wearing sweatpants to the gym). The gifts imparted by the universe unto a woman, it is understood, are intended for the entire world and for her to hide them is selfish and ungrateful (unless of course she’s ugly, in which case a shapeless outfit represents the merciful gift of invisibility). The desexualized woman is either lowering herself or unworthy of interest in the first place.

I also hear from people saying that I should show my face and smile more. If you are my grandmother, this request is acceptable. If you are not my grandmother, I can only assume that you’ve never heard my music.

Then there is the assumption that women are incapable of (or uninterested in) anything requiring technical prowess. When I recorded an EP with my friend Nataly Dawn a few years ago, people were asking who produced it. We did. The recording process was transparent as we filmed it in our home studio, but some viewers assumed they were missing something. If you observe other examples of this video format (known as a “VideoSong”) on YouTube, this is not a question that men are asked. It is assumed, usually correctly, that it is a format for the DIY artist. Apparently DIY for two women just means that we did our own hair and makeup.

To be clear, the world has plenty of people who are listening to music intelligently and not perpetuating these issues. I’m fortunate enough to have many of them as fans. A lot of them do post thoughtful responses to my music on YouTube or on other forums. What’s more, I also try to remind myself that a large number of these listeners who “get it” are not people who comment on YouTube videos, so perhaps the observable ratio of relevant to irrelevant feedback does not represent people’s reactions on the whole. All of this gives me hope. Still, we have a problem.

In conclusion, I dislike that it’s difficult for a woman to have her work be valued as a separate entity from her appearance or sexuality. To be visible at all as a woman, it seems, is to encourage people to miss the point. None of this is news, obviously, but dammit, I dislike it.

Also olives. Never been a fan of those.

the-lady-of-reichenbach:

frozenfontana:

iaintnopapaya:

Disney Princesses as sloths.

but why

image

my entire life.

dear-white-people:

YOU DEMANDED IT! Check out the full-length official trailer for Dear White People before it hits theaters this weekend.

this. is. gonna. be. so. good.

tancredmusic:

fieldmouse:

Record release day is here! It really happened! 

Thanks for being so good to us. This has been the most exciting time and we are so very thankful for everyone who believes in us, even a little bit.

You can get the record directly from Topshelf, your favorite online music peddler, or your local record store! 

Buy this beautiful record made by wonderful people.

yaaas

geesharpminor:

Thanks for the epic officiant selfie tip dannielle!!

HI GUESS WHAT I INSPIRED THE WORLD TO START DOING SELFIES DURING WEDDING CEREMONIES YOU ARE ALL WELCOME BYE. ALSO LOOK AT THESE COSTUMES.

walkthemoonband:

We’re thrilled to announce that, with your help, we raised $1,581 last night for @EveryoneIsGay. Huge thanks to everyone who bought merch and helped us support this great organization. To find out more, visit them at www.everyoneisgay.com. Big hearts from us to you. You’re amazing. #differentcolors #loveislove

This is literally killing me. We are so far beyond grateful. 

arcticmunkeez:

*goes a few hours without internet access* wow i’m so healthy and wild i could live in the woods

kristinethune:

allisonweiss:

TS003 IS NOW AVAILABLE - SUMMER TOUR DATES EDITION

12” x 18” poster designed by Werewolf Girlfriend with shoes illustration by Kristine Thune. Hand printed in Los Angeles, CA by Dave Kloc. Signed and numbered by yours truly.

Pick it up today at the Tour Shop!

look at this beautiful shoes illustration that i did for my pal, allison weiss! then buy a poster and THEN go see her play at warped tour this summer!

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.
— 出典:

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem)